Event

Dec 15, 2020
Historicizing Ableism and Ageism

Historicizing Ageism in Medicine

Lara Keuck

This talk discusses what the history of ageism can tell us about epistemic injustice in medicine. When the term “age-ism” entered the medical debate in the late 1960s, it was presented as a cause for the lack of funding for medical research on ageing. Nowadays, the WHO defines ageism as “an insidious practice which has harmful effects on the health of older adults.” However, ageism not only causes negative medical impacts, but medical research and practice can also contribute to ageism. I will exemplify the complicated relationship between ageism and medicine with respect to the history of an age-related disease, Alzheimer’s disease. My talk closes with reflections on how this perspective raises questions about current employments of age for the stratification of risk groups in present-day medicine in general and for anti-Corona measures in particular.

Biographies

Contact and Registration

The Institute’s Colloquium occurs once per month during the academic year. For further information about the series, please contact Lisa Onaga and/or Stephanie Hood.

This event will take place online: the meeting link will be sent to Institute members via MPIWG-Announce the day before the event.

A limited number of places are available to external participants—please email public@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de by the day before the event to register.

 

About the Institute's Colloquium Series 2020/21

2020-12-15T14:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2020-12-15 14:00:00 2020-12-15 15:30:00 Historicizing Ableism and Ageism Historicizing Ageism in Medicine Lara Keuck This talk discusses what the history of ageism can tell us about epistemic injustice in medicine. When the term “age-ism” entered the medical debate in the late 1960s, it was presented as a cause for the lack of funding for medical research on ageing. Nowadays, the WHO defines ageism as “an insidious practice which has harmful effects on the health of older adults.” However, ageism not only causes negative medical impacts, but medical research and practice can also contribute to ageism. I will exemplify the complicated relationship between ageism and medicine with respect to the history of an age-related disease, Alzheimer’s disease. My talk closes with reflections on how this perspective raises questions about current employments of age for the stratification of risk groups in present-day medicine in general and for anti-Corona measures in particular. Biographies Lara Keuck Lara Keuck’s research lies at the intersection of history of science and philosophy of medicine. She holds a Branco Weiss Fellowship of ETH Zurich and leads a junior research group at Humboldt University Berlin on “Learning from Alzheimer’s Disease: A History of Biomedical Models of Mental Illness.” In 2021, she will move to the MPIWG to start a new Max Planck Research Group on “Practices of Validation in the Biomedical Sciences.” Photograph: Junge Akademie/Peter Hinsel Lisa OnagaStephanie HoodPablo Ruiz de Olano Lisa OnagaStephanie HoodPablo Ruiz de Olano Europe/Berlin public