Event

Oct 1, 2019
Early Modern Textbooks and Digital Tools: Exploring the Transmission of Knowledge

This talk aims to explore various ways to connect traditional research in the history of philosophy and science with the use of digital tools. I focus on one case, which I consider a privileged example for the complex ways of knowledge transmission at the birth of the modern science. I discuss the case of a treatise on physics written by a Cartesian (Jacques Rohault), translated and annotated by a Newtonian (Samuel Clarke), and spread in several European universities (e.g., Cambridge). Tracing an accurate timeline is not the only challenge raised by this case. Equally important is to answer the question of how to evaluate the treatise in the context of dynamic changes in Clarke’s annotations. A traditional print edition of the treatise does not cope well with the number of early modern imprints of the treatise and a digital edition would be more meaningful. I explain how digital humanities can inform the discussion and provide new means to understand the spread of Cartesianism, raising fresh questions concerning translation, networks, and the diffusion of concepts.

 

Address
Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany
Room
Room 215
Contact and Registration

All are welcome to attend, regardless of prior experience of the digital humanities. Registration is required for external participants. To register, and for further information on the Digital Humanities Brown Bag Lunch series email Research IT Group.

About This Series

Brown Bag Lunch is a bi-weekly meeting of researchers at the MPIWG who use or want to learn more about digital research methods, broadly encompassed by the term Digital Humanities. In the Brown Bag Lunch meetings, researchers can discuss tools, share ideas and experiences (good and bad), and learn from each other. Each session explores a new topic; workshops are usually interactive, and we often invite external speakers. Please feel free to bring your lunch, and a laptop or notebook in order to participate!

2019-10-01T12:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2019-10-01 12:00:00 2019-10-01 13:30:00 Early Modern Textbooks and Digital Tools: Exploring the Transmission of Knowledge This talk aims to explore various ways to connect traditional research in the history of philosophy and science with the use of digital tools. I focus on one case, which I consider a privileged example for the complex ways of knowledge transmission at the birth of the modern science. I discuss the case of a treatise on physics written by a Cartesian (Jacques Rohault), translated and annotated by a Newtonian (Samuel Clarke), and spread in several European universities (e.g., Cambridge). Tracing an accurate timeline is not the only challenge raised by this case. Equally important is to answer the question of how to evaluate the treatise in the context of dynamic changes in Clarke’s annotations. A traditional print edition of the treatise does not cope well with the number of early modern imprints of the treatise and a digital edition would be more meaningful. I explain how digital humanities can inform the discussion and provide new means to understand the spread of Cartesianism, raising fresh questions concerning translation, networks, and the diffusion of concepts.   Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany Room 215 Florian KräutliDirk WintergrünShih-Pei ChenRobert Casties Florian KräutliDirk WintergrünShih-Pei ChenRobert Casties Europe/Berlin public