Event

Jun 19, 2018
Media History and Its Objects​

Lisa Gitelman is a professor of Media History at New York University. She received her BA, MA and DPhil. degrees in English at the University of Chicago.

Gitelman’s research focuses on American book history, techniques of inscription, and the new media of yesterday and today. She is particularly concerned with tracing the patterns according to which new media become meaningful within and against the contexts of older media.

Her books include Paper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents (2014), a recent edited collection, “Raw Data” Is an Oxymoron (2013), Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture (2006), New Media, 1740–1915 (together with Geoffrey B. Pingree, 2003), Thomas Edison and Modern America: An Introduction with Documents (together with Theresa M. Collins, 2002) and Scripts, Grooves, and Writing Machines: Representing Technology in the Edison Era (1999).

She is a former editor of the Thomas A. Edison Papers at Rutgers University and helped to create the Department of Media Studies at Catholic University.

Organizer(s)
Address

Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany

Room
Main Conference Room
Contact and Registration

The Institute's Colloquium is a public event, open to all with no registration required. Attendance is mandatory for Institute’s members. For further information please email Ohad Parnes.

About This Series

The Institute’s Colloquium occurs once per month during the academic year. The usual format is 45 minutes of presentation by the paper's author, followed by 45 minutes of Q&A discussion. No prior reading or preparation is required for this event series. Coffee and cake is served after the talk.

2018-06-19T14:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2018-06-19 14:00:00 2018-06-19 16:00:00 Media History and Its Objects​ Lisa Gitelman is a professor of Media History at New York University. She received her BA, MA and DPhil. degrees in English at the University of Chicago. Gitelman’s research focuses on American book history, techniques of inscription, and the new media of yesterday and today. She is particularly concerned with tracing the patterns according to which new media become meaningful within and against the contexts of older media. Her books include Paper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents (2014), a recent edited collection, “Raw Data” Is an Oxymoron (2013), Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture (2006), New Media, 1740–1915 (together with Geoffrey B. Pingree, 2003), Thomas Edison and Modern America: An Introduction with Documents (together with Theresa M. Collins, 2002) and Scripts, Grooves, and Writing Machines: Representing Technology in the Edison Era (1999). She is a former editor of the Thomas A. Edison Papers at Rutgers University and helped to create the Department of Media Studies at Catholic University. MPIWG Ohad Parnes admin@example.com Europe/Berlin public