Event

Jul 21, 2021
Seeing Red: Theorizing the Intersection between Scientific Infrastructure and Geopolitics

Abstract:
From the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope to state-of-the-art polar research ships to building its very own mega-sized particle-collider, China is increasingly leveraging its financial clout and technical prowess to bankroll and engineer advanced, large-scale research infrastructure. As nexuses of international research and sources of prestige, these facilities illustrate how science, although globalized, is at the same time unavoidably spatially embedded. This presentation will explore a series of conceptual frameworks for studying the geographical situatedness of large-scale scientific infrastructures. I will present some preliminary theorization about how to best map both the topologies and topographies of these infrastructures, drawing primarily on concepts from Actor-Network Theory. This is then brought to bear on China with the aim to demonstrate how these concepts can help elucidate the geopolitical implications of the country’s push to become a “big science” power.

Discussant:
Yishu Mao

Contact and Registration

For further information about the LMRG Research Workshop series, specific session or registration (a limited number of places are available), please contact Dieu Linh Bui Dao.

About This Series

The LMRG Research Workshop is a venue for members of the Lise Meitner Research Group, "China in the Global System of Science," to share work in progress on an ongoing basis. It is an opportunity to raise questions, discuss methodological challenges, or get feedback on preliminary conclusions. We aim to create a supportive atmosphere that combines rigorous criticism with genuine curiosity. 

2021-07-21T14:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2021-07-21 14:00:00 2021-07-21 15:30:00 Seeing Red: Theorizing the Intersection between Scientific Infrastructure and Geopolitics Abstract: From the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope to state-of-the-art polar research ships to building its very own mega-sized particle-collider, China is increasingly leveraging its financial clout and technical prowess to bankroll and engineer advanced, large-scale research infrastructure. As nexuses of international research and sources of prestige, these facilities illustrate how science, although globalized, is at the same time unavoidably spatially embedded. This presentation will explore a series of conceptual frameworks for studying the geographical situatedness of large-scale scientific infrastructures. I will present some preliminary theorization about how to best map both the topologies and topographies of these infrastructures, drawing primarily on concepts from Actor-Network Theory. This is then brought to bear on China with the aim to demonstrate how these concepts can help elucidate the geopolitical implications of the country’s push to become a “big science” power. Discussant: Yishu Mao Cheryl Schmitz Cheryl Schmitz Europe/Berlin public