Event

Jan 23, 2018
Network Analytic Methods Researching Scientific Innovations

Malte studied economics, management and sociology at the University of Witten/Herdecke and defended his dissertation in economic sociology at ZU Friedrichshafen. In his thesis, Malte developed and operationalized a relational definition of product quality that incorporates the outcomes of non-pecuniary valuation processes on markets into a formal model of market formation and reproduction. This work is the result of a longstanding engagement with the socioeconomic models of production of mathematical sociologist Harrison White. Malte was a Visiting Scholar at the sociology department of Columbia University and at the Network Analysis Center of Duke University, and has visited Stanford University. He has designed and taught university courses on microeconomics, the sociology of markets, and on sociological network theory.

Address

Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany

Room
Room 265
Contact and Registration

All are welcome to attend, regardless of prior experience of the digital humanities. Registration is required for external participants. To register, and for further information on the Digital Humanities Brown Bag Lunch series email Research IT Group.

About This Series

The Digital Humanities Brown Bag Lunch Workshop occurs bi-weekly. Each session explores a new topic; workshops are usually interactive, and we often invite external speakers. Please feel free to bring your lunch, and a laptop or notebook in order to participate!

2018-01-23T12:30:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2018-01-23 12:30:00 2018-01-23 14:00:00 Network Analytic Methods Researching Scientific Innovations Malte studied economics, management and sociology at the University of Witten/Herdecke and defended his dissertation in economic sociology at ZU Friedrichshafen. In his thesis, Malte developed and operationalized a relational definition of product quality that incorporates the outcomes of non-pecuniary valuation processes on markets into a formal model of market formation and reproduction. This work is the result of a longstanding engagement with the socioeconomic models of production of mathematical sociologist Harrison White. Malte was a Visiting Scholar at the sociology department of Columbia University and at the Network Analysis Center of Duke University, and has visited Stanford University. He has designed and taught university courses on microeconomics, the sociology of markets, and on sociological network theory. MPIWG Florian Kräutli admin@example.com Europe/Berlin public