Event

May 14-15, 2020
Locality and Geographical Knowledge in Imperial China

For over two millennia of Chinese imperial history, geography played an integral role not only in local  and  state  administration, but  also  in  literary  and  visual  representations. As officials and literati collected and organized geographical data and knowledge, such efforts at local levels demonstrated both proximity to and distance from the centers of imperial authority. Why and how did officials and literati represent localities? How did they structure spatial information? Where do we find the“imperial” in the “local” and the“local” in the “imperial”?This workshop proposes a diachronic and place-­based approach to examining the processes of producing and organizing geographical knowledge in imperial China. Our aim is to bring to  light  the structural  and epistemological  tensions between  the  standardization  and localization of geographical knowledge beyond the temporal bounds of each dynasty and expand the view to the wide array of source materials that describe“things” according to their spatial configurations, such  as local  gazetteers,  poetry,  empire-wide  geographical compilations,  geographical  treatises  from standard  histories, and any  form  of  visual representations. These sources draw the boundaries of localities in divergent ways, and this workshop  will probe  the  manner  in  which the boundaries  were drawn,  negotiated,  and redefined in geographical representations. 

Program

Address
MPIWG, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany
Room
Main Conference Room
2020-05-14T00:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2020-05-14 00:00:00 2020-05-15 00:00:00 Locality and Geographical Knowledge in Imperial China For over two millennia of Chinese imperial history, geography played an integral role not only in local  and  state  administration, but  also  in  literary  and  visual  representations. As officials and literati collected and organized geographical data and knowledge, such efforts at local levels demonstrated both proximity to and distance from the centers of imperial authority. Why and how did officials and literati represent localities? How did they structure spatial information? Where do we find the“imperial” in the “local” and the“local” in the “imperial”?This workshop proposes a diachronic and place-­based approach to examining the processes of producing and organizing geographical knowledge in imperial China. Our aim is to bring to  light  the structural  and epistemological  tensions between  the  standardization  and localization of geographical knowledge beyond the temporal bounds of each dynasty and expand the view to the wide array of source materials that describe“things” according to their spatial configurations, such  as local  gazetteers,  poetry,  empire-wide  geographical compilations,  geographical  treatises  from standard  histories, and any  form  of  visual representations. These sources draw the boundaries of localities in divergent ways, and this workshop  will probe  the  manner  in  which the boundaries  were drawn,  negotiated,  and redefined in geographical representations.  Program Thursday May 14, 2020 09:00–10:45               Introduction 10:00–11:00               Panel #1: Geographical knowledge of borderland localities I Chair: Alexis Lycas Discussant: Jörg Hüsemann Andrew Chittick / Commentator: Janine Nicol The Wu Region as Locality and as Empire Jon Felt / Commentator: CHU Ming-kin Southeast Asia in the Shuijing zhu 11:00–11:30               Break 11:30–12:30               Panel #2: Geographical knowledge of borderland localities II Chair: Masato Hasegawa Discussant: Jörg Hüsemann Linda Feng / Commentator: Brian Lander Producing Knowledge of the Sea: Marine Life and a Ninth-century Geographical Miscellany of Lingnan JIANG Yonglin / Commentator: Lin Fan Mapping a Miao Place: Constructing Geographical Knowledge and Cultural Identity in Ming and Qing Cartography 12:30–13:30               Lunch 13:30–15:00               Panel #3: Epistemic changes and the organization of geographical knowledge Chair: Shih-Pei Chen Discussant: Chu Ping-tzu Mario Cams / Commentator: Elizabeth Kindall Place Versus Space: Understanding Late Imperial ‘General Gazetteers’ CHU Ming-kin / Commentator: Andrew Chittick How were local worthies represented in local gazetteers and court compilations? An analysis of the biographies of Changzhou worthies in the Song period Joseph Dennis / Commentator: Catherine Jami Data Collection Practices for Ming-Qing Local Gazetteers 15:00–15:30               Break 15:30–16:30               Discussion Friday May 15, 2020 09:30–11:00               Panel #4: Political and economic values of geographical representations Chair: Masato Hasegawa Discussant: Robin Yates Tristan Brown / Commentator: Joseph Dennis Fengshui and the Cartographic Sciences in Late Imperial China Catherine Jami / Commentator: KUNG Ling-Wei The Kangxi Emperor (r. 1662-1722) and the Scholarly Construction of the Qing Empire Brian Lander / Commentator: Griet Vankeerberghen The Production of Geographical Knowledge in the Qin Empire 11:00–11:30               Break 11:30–13:00               Panel #5: Materiality and expertise Chair: Dagmar Schäfer Discussant: XU Chun LIN Fan / Commentator: Mario Cams Ontology of Middle-Period Chinese Maps: Materiality and Literacy in Cartographic Practice Elizabeth Kindall / Commentator: Tristan Brown Documenting Spiritual Geography KUNG Ling-Wei / Commentator: Eloise Wright Between Imperiality and Locality: Imperial Envoy Lama Tsultrim Zangpo Lharampa and Geographical Knowledge of the Himalayas in Qing China and the World 13:00–14:00               Lunch 14:00–15:30               Panel #6: The memory and authority of geographical texts Chair: Alexis Lycas Discussant: Michael Höckelmann Janine Nicol / Commentator: Jon Felt Shi Daoxuan and the production of Buddhist geographic knowledge Griet Vankeerberghen / Commentator: Linda Feng The Sanfu huangtu: Writing Memories of the Qin/Han Capital Region Eloise Wright / Commentator: JIANG Yonglin “Locality”on the Borderlands: Structure and Intertextuality in the 1563 Dali fuzhi 15:30–16:30               Break 16:00–17:00               Discussion / Wrap-up / Publication plans MPIWG, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany Main Conference Room Shih-Pei ChenMasato HasegawaAlexis Lycas (Ecole pratique des hautes études) Shih-Pei ChenMasato HasegawaAlexis Lycas (Ecole pratique des hautes études) Europe/Berlin public