Event

Mar 24, 2020
Rethinking Collaboration: Medical research and Working Relationships at the Iranian Pasteur Institute

The Pasteur Institute of Iran underwent a major expansion of its research productivity and international recognition during some of the most momentous events of Iranian history: the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry, followed by the Anglo-American coup against prime minister Mohammad Mosaddegh in 1953. During this period, the Institute's French director Marcel Baltazard was embedded in a complex set of working relationships with his Iranian employees, research subjects, and government ministers; American scientists and foreign aid workers; and French Pasteurians and diplomats. Baltazard constantly described these relationships as instances of "collaboration." The temporal and geographical context demands a critical reading of scientific collaboration alongside the negative implications of political collaboration. Investigating the political commitments and social attitudes of the French director and Iranian staff, this paper demonstrates that scientific collaboration at the Institute both reinforced socioeconomic inequalities within Iran, and mirrored global Cold War geopolitics that undermined Iranian sovereignty.

Address
Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany
Contact and Registration

Open to all, no registration required. Please contact the organizers if you have any questions about the event.

About This Series

The seminar series "Science, Technology and Diplomacy During the Cold War and Beyond: Frameworks, Perspectives, and Challenges" aims to provide a forum that takes account of exciting developments within recent scholarship on science during the Cold War—especially, but not limited to, the approaches of transnational and global history. Read more about the series here.

2020-03-24T14:00:00SAVE IN I-CAL 2020-03-24 14:00:00 2020-03-24 15:30:00 Rethinking Collaboration: Medical research and Working Relationships at the Iranian Pasteur Institute The Pasteur Institute of Iran underwent a major expansion of its research productivity and international recognition during some of the most momentous events of Iranian history: the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry, followed by the Anglo-American coup against prime minister Mohammad Mosaddegh in 1953. During this period, the Institute's French director Marcel Baltazard was embedded in a complex set of working relationships with his Iranian employees, research subjects, and government ministers; American scientists and foreign aid workers; and French Pasteurians and diplomats. Baltazard constantly described these relationships as instances of "collaboration." The temporal and geographical context demands a critical reading of scientific collaboration alongside the negative implications of political collaboration. Investigating the political commitments and social attitudes of the French director and Iranian staff, this paper demonstrates that scientific collaboration at the Institute both reinforced socioeconomic inequalities within Iran, and mirrored global Cold War geopolitics that undermined Iranian sovereignty. MPIWG Alison KraftRoberto LalliGiulia RispoliJaehwan Hyun admin@example.com Europe/Berlin public