“Innovate with the Party!” In Shenzhen, a man plays with his phone with a large propaganda poster in the background.  Source: Halldór Berg Harðarson (2019)

“Innovate with the Party!” In Shenzhen, a man plays with his phone with a large propaganda poster in the background.

Source: Halldór Berg Harðarson (2019)

Project (2020-)

Internationalization vs. Centralized Control? Managing Research Talent with Chinese Characteristics (China’s Got Talent)

The world's largest radio telescope, a land-rover on the dark side of the moon, an international ethical scandal caused by gene-editing of human embryos: Chinese science and technology have recently gained unprecedented global visibility. PR China might overtake the US as the world’s biggest research and development spender; it has already become the world’s biggest producer of scientific articles. In the 21st century, cooperation and competition in research, innovation, and higher education are important components of China’s relationship with the world, Europe, and Germany included.

The attraction of research talents has been a prominent feature of China’s science policy. Their human capital, education, skillsets, and global networks play an important role in China's endeavor to become a knowledge-based, innovation-driven economy. Existing Sino-foreign dialogues, science diplomacy stakeholders, joint research projects, laboratories, campuses, funding programs, and scientific associations demonstrate that aspirations for Chinese science are global. Yet universities and research institutes are also embedded in the national political and social discourse. How do talents and their scientific organizations navigate such complexities in China? The project also investigates the agency of these individuals in shaping their organizational environment.

 

Strelcova_Innovate with the Party

“Innovate with the Party!” In Shenzhen, a man plays with his phone with a large propaganda poster in the background.

Source: Halldór Berg Harðarson (2019)